3rd Party Training Materials or Official CompTIA Learn & Labs

J Siergiej

Member
  • Jul 27, 2022
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    I'd like to ask why some trainers/colleges choose to use 3rd party training materials over CompTIA's official Learn & Labs and Practice. My thoughts are, since CompTIA is the certifying body, doesn't it make sense to use their materials? They are guaranteed to cover the necessary topics right?

    With all the different 3rd party training options out there, what makes them better the CompTIA's? I know everyone wants to create their own and make some coin but I wouldn't go to a Chevy shop to fix my Ferrari. :) (I don't have a Ferrari) Maybe I would if I created my own study materials.......

    I just ran an A+ class using L&L and it went great. Their supplied slides are crap and need a lot of mods but they flow with the lessons.

    Thoughts anyone and thank you.

    j
     

    Stephen Schneiter

    Administrator
    Staff member
  • Nov 26, 2018
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    Knoxville, TN
    Hi @J Siergiej, I agree that the CompTIA content is a good product, and your reasoning behind using. Although there is separation between exam development and content departments, as required by exam accreditation, the content development strives to cover the exam objectives thoroughly.

    I have always thought that publishers slides are pretty bland and need supporting content along with some "spice" and "bling added to them to make them presentable to students. CompTIA is no exception, the slides, to me, provide a starting point and the instructor has the ability to change, add, or remove as neccessary. So, I think that is an advantage as you have building blocks as a head start in preparing your course.
     

    Jill West

    Well-known member
  • Sep 13, 2019
    151
    188
    13,571
    Dalton, GA
    I'd like to ask why some trainers/colleges choose to use 3rd party training materials over CompTIA's official Learn & Labs and Practice. My thoughts are, since CompTIA is the certifying body, doesn't it make sense to use their materials? They are guaranteed to cover the necessary topics right?

    With all the different 3rd party training options out there, what makes them better the CompTIA's? I know everyone wants to create their own and make some coin but I wouldn't go to a Chevy shop to fix my Ferrari. :) (I don't have a Ferrari) Maybe I would if I created my own study materials.......

    I just ran an A+ class using L&L and it went great. Their supplied slides are crap and need a lot of mods but they flow with the lessons.

    Thoughts anyone and thank you.

    j
    From a content developer's perspective, I'll just say... Some companies place greater emphasis on learning design, pedagogy, and learning theory than others do. There are also many different learning audiences, and no single product can do a good job of addressing all these audiences' needs. Some products are designed more as a checklist for boot camps and students who just need to fill a few gaps in their existing expertise. While others are written for longer courses, like a college semester-length class, and intended to take students from "don't know any of this" to "competent in all objectives to the levels required."
     
    Hi @J Siergiej, I agree that the CompTIA content is a good product, and your reasoning behind using. Although there is separation between exam development and content departments, as required by exam accreditation, the content development strives to cover the exam objectives thoroughly.

    I have always thought that publishers slides are pretty bland and need supporting content along with some "spice" and "bling added to them to make them presentable to students. CompTIA is no exception, the slides, to me, provide a starting point and the instructor has the ability to change, add, or remove as neccessary. So, I think that is an advantage as you have building blocks as a head start in preparing your course.
    I am training Security+ now. My prep involves adding 10% of content to the slideshow and hiding 10% of the inherited slides. All in all, the volume of slides turns out about the same.
     
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    Reactions: GrayChurch
    From a content developer's perspective, I'll just say... Some companies place greater emphasis on learning design, pedagogy, and learning theory than others do. There are also many different learning audiences, and no single product can do a good job of addressing all these audiences' needs. Some products are designed more as a checklist for boot camps and students who just need to fill a few gaps in their existing expertise. While others are written for longer courses, like a college semester-length class, and intended to take students from "don't know any of this" to "competent in all objectives to the levels required."
     
    Good explanation. Students have different reading levels and experiences at different locations. Also some materials present more just the facts and some do more explanations. Some of better labs, test banks etc. And there is always costs issues. None including CompTIA "guarantee" exact coverage of exam or materials to exam. Even instructors who are certified presentations should vary. None of this against CompTIA or any other materials, but why different are better depending on situations.
     

    Rick Butler

    Well-known member
  • Aug 8, 2019
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    Colorado Springs, CO
    www.intellitec.edu
    I'd like to ask why some trainers/colleges choose to use 3rd party training materials over CompTIA's official Learn & Labs and Practice. My thoughts are, since CompTIA is the certifying body, doesn't it make sense to use their materials? They are guaranteed to cover the necessary topics right?

    Hi @J Siergiej, I agree that the CompTIA content is a good product, and your reasoning behind using. Although there is separation between exam development and content departments, as required by exam accreditation, the content development strives to cover the exam objectives thoroughly.
    One would hope, but as Stephen articulated here, that wall of separation is necessary - and the way I see it, I think it's a good thing.

    There's also the prerequisite knowledge and experience angle. CompTIA suggests (and logically so) the progressive order of ITF, A+, and Net+ completed, for example, before doing Sec+. However, anyone that has taught knows there are always students who enter the chain farther up - students that may be lacking in prerequisite knowledge. There's already a little bit of overlap built into the chain, but sometimes, instructors have to go back to cover that prerequisite material.
    From a content developer's perspective, I'll just say... Some companies place greater emphasis on learning design, pedagogy, and learning theory than others do. There are also many different learning audiences, and no single product can do a good job of addressing all these audiences' needs.
    The two competing of these needs are 1) to learn the material for knowledge sake and 2) to pass the exam. One would hope that these goals are not mutually exclusive, but in my time in the classroom, I see both of these goals as prevalent. Teaching strictly to objectives, for example, is really more aimed at preparing students to pass an exam. Some classes are more holistic in their design, so they are going to present material that might be good for students to know, but not necessarily something they will see on an exam.
    And there is always costs issues. None including CompTIA "guarantee" exact coverage of exam or materials to exam. Even instructors who are certified presentations should vary. None of this against CompTIA or any other materials, but why different are better depending on situations.
    Every student is different. Every instructor is different. Every institution is different, so naturally, the curriculum has to adapt to those three dynamics. CompTIA is great and we use it here in my school. But it's not the end-all, it's an option. There are many great content writers here in CIN, but that's what's it's all about, right?
     
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    Reactions: Red Kohler
    I second that.
    I used to work as a contract Instructor for many different training centers and it seems that they all had different materials, at the end of the day, we as Trainers need to take whichever format and source we are given ans make the best out of it. We have to be able to adapt to our environment and make the best of it.

    I personally enjoy the official compTIA cert master series with the labs as well.
    and with the test out labs coming this year.. will just make it better.
     
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    Reactions: J Siergiej