Advisory Committee Meeting

One of the requirements for most academic programs that are characterized by the label "career and technical education" is they need to have advisory committees composed of people from business and industry ("employers"). This requirement is in likely recognition of a need to have input on what we should be teaching (as opposed to what we want to teach). Yesterday I participated in a meeting, where my primary function was to convince respected industry insiders to participate. The conversations were interesting, with a focus on what the participants thought of the list of knowledge, skills, and abilities prepared by faculty. Below is a link to a video of the meeting. To get to the "meat" of the conversation it probably makes sense to move forward to 00:24:00. What meetings like this suggest is we need to listen to the people in the industry.

Video Link:
 

Stephen Schneiter

Administrator
Staff member
  • Nov 26, 2018
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    5
    1,145
    Knoxville, TN
    I have served on some advisory committees and when I was in the classroom running an IT program had an advisory committee. The committees can be good. I agree with @Lee McWhorter that it comes down to our we listening to the advise or checking a box. Benefits also come form the advisory members, are they really there to help develop talent or showing up for refreshments, and to check a box for their organization.

    If done correctly, and advisory group can really develop a successful IT program and lead to jobs for students coming from the program.
     
    Schools that are career and tech focused that are accredited by ACCSC are required to hold what are called Program Advisory Committee meetings, twice a year. Prior to COVID, they had to meet at the school itself to evaluate the learning environment. Preferably, they want to see the committees operate independently of the school, with their own agenda/members, with guidelines that would help committee members evaluate the programs.

    I am an evaluator for ABHES (medical school accreditor but I do the IT programs that they accredit) and part of my task list is to reach out to the various PAC members and talk about this relationship. Schools actually can get in dutch if they don't actively involve their PAC's in program steering.

    It's always a challenge getting PAC members involved in program development. But as @Stephen Schneiter said, if it's worked right, the PAC can be a vital bonus to a program, particularly with the "external validation" question.

    /r
     

    Liz Wannemacher

    VP Marketing @ CompTIA
    Staff member
    Jul 31, 2019
    109
    1
    264
    Chicago, Illinois
    partners.comptia.org
    One of the requirements for most academic programs that are characterized by the label "career and technical education" is they need to have advisory committees composed of people from business and industry ("employers"). This requirement is in likely recognition of a need to have input on what we should be teaching (as opposed to what we want to teach). Yesterday I participated in a meeting, where my primary function was to convince respected industry insiders to participate. The conversations were interesting, with a focus on what the participants thought of the list of knowledge, skills, and abilities prepared by faculty. Below is a link to a video of the meeting. To get to the "meat" of the conversation it probably makes sense to move forward to 00:24:00. What meetings like this suggest is we need to listen to the people in the industry.

    Video Link:
    Curious, what was your biggest take-a-way? Was there anything surprising or validating?