Looking at what equipment would be best to stand up a lab to train for Network+, Security+ and Server+?

Gary Amerson

Well-known member
Aug 5, 2020
5
1
I'm mainly looking at teaching at an undergraduate level, with real hands on, in order to provide students the instruction they need to pass any/all of the certifications listed.

I've considered the following: https://www.certificationtrainingsolutions.com/product/ccna-security-standard-labkit/ even though it's listed as CCNA, think it could be used for Network+ and Security+.

Does anyone know of another company that sells similar products, maybe geared more towards CompTIA?

Any and all suggestions appreciated.

Gary
 

Gary Amerson

Well-known member
Aug 5, 2020
5
1
Turns out CompTIA has suggested lab setups in their setup guides for each of their certifications. I've attached the one page from the Network+ guide but it goes into great detail about what VMs and such need to be configured. I've seen these before on the CompTIA website, just not sure where.
 

Attachments

  • Setup Guide for Network+_Page_04.png
    Setup Guide for Network+_Page_04.png
    219.6 KB · Views: 38

Tess Sluijter

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2020
243
1
340
the Netherlands
www.kilala.nl
Huh, would you look at that?! All things considered, with all the parts and the fact that it includes training materials, that's surprisingly good value. I wonder if they ship to Europe :D I love the 12U mini-rack they optionally include.

Also, I read this line on the ad:

Above all, we provide you with UNLIMITED FREE technical support for each lab you purchase. We’re just an e-mail or phone call away ready to help you.

... and wondered if they know what they're getting into :D What with the amount of questions you see pouring in on Reddit and other fora, I imagine their help line can get very busy.
 
You can do a lot with VirtualBox and HyperV. Especially for Security+ and Networking. Packet Tracer for Cisco labs. Cisco has a recommended set of routers and switches for the CCNA labs. Over the years I just kept on crating more and more labs for students with very little equipment due to cost.
 

Gary Amerson

Well-known member
Aug 5, 2020
5
1
Huh, would you look at that?! All things considered, with all the parts and the fact that it includes training materials, that's surprisingly good value. I wonder if they ship to Europe :D I love the 12U mini-rack they optionally include.

Also, I read this line on the ad:



... and wondered if they know what they're getting into :D What with the amount of questions you see pouring in on Reddit and other fora, I imagine their help line can get very busy.
I'm looking at purchasing a couple of the student versions and adding either a small server to each or a Raspberry Pi. I'll let you know my impressions if the purchase is approved. Completely agree regarding the tech support statement. . . .
 

Dakota Copeland

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2021
5
1
You can do a lot with VirtualBox and HyperV. Especially for Security+ and Networking. Packet Tracer for Cisco labs. Cisco has a recommended set of routers and switches for the CCNA labs. Over the years I just kept on crating more and more labs for students with very little equipment due to cost.
I like packet tracer because it can also show you what's happening through the OSI model and how packets and frames traverse.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hod Berman

John M. Jones

Well-known member
Sep 12, 2020
11
11
Turns out CompTIA has suggested lab setups in their setup guides for each of their certifications. I've attached the one page from the Network+ guide but it goes into great detail about what VMs and such need to be configured. I've seen these before on the CompTIA website, just not sure where.
Gary, where are the lab setup guides found, looked in the instructor guide for the new SY0-601 and didn't see one?
 
While I'm appreciative of the benefits associated with using real hardware in our teaching labs, I think we have to be realistic with what's going on with IT and a move towards software-defined networking and virtualization. This morning I received an email that pointed to a workshop today that discusses repurposing higher education computer labs (yes turning them into regular classrooms). You can read about it by clicking HERE.

Having taught in the previous century, I'm well aware of the limitations that existed when the hardware-only approach to teaching existed. Building a computer with multiple removable drive bays so I could demo RAID-5 functionality was fun, but it was too burdensome to have each student's computer set up in this manner. With those type-2 hypervisors identified above, well it is a breeze for students to experience labs showing RAID functionality.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tess Sluijter

Dakota Copeland

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2021
5
1
While I'm appreciative of the benefits associated with using real hardware in our teaching labs, I think we have to be realistic with what's going on with IT and a move towards software-defined networking and virtualization. This morning I received an email that pointed to a workshop today that discusses repurposing higher education computer labs (yes turning them into regular classrooms). You can read about it by clicking HERE.

Having taught in the previous century, I'm well aware of the limitations that existed when the hardware-only approach to teaching existed. Building a computer with multiple removable drive bays so I could demo RAID-5 functionality was fun, but it was too burdensome to have each student's computer set up in this manner. With those type-2 hypervisors identified above, well it is a breeze for students to experience labs showing RAID functionality.
Good luck convincing the Department of Corrections to go cloud in the classroom they barely allow us to have internet even for me as instructor I have the same access as the students.
 
Your situation is clearly challenging, but by using a type 2 hypervisor (assuming your student computers have enough CPU and RAM), many of the concepts relating to operating systems and networking can be taught in a closed environment (I suspect that is likely what you are currently doing). My point in all of this is whether we like it or not, for a variety of reasons, I suspect we are returning to the old days where endpoints are akin to dumb terminals and 99% of the processing will be done in a beefy remote server/network environment.
 

Nate G

Well-known member
  • Aug 12, 2020
    32
    27
    While I'm appreciative of the benefits associated with using real hardware in our teaching labs, I think we have to be realistic with what's going on with IT and a move towards software-defined networking and virtualization. This morning I received an email that pointed to a workshop today that discusses repurposing higher education computer labs (yes turning them into regular classrooms). You can read about it by clicking HERE.

    Having taught in the previous century, I'm well aware of the limitations that existed when the hardware-only approach to teaching existed. Building a computer with multiple removable drive bays so I could demo RAID-5 functionality was fun, but it was too burdensome to have each student's computer set up in this manner. With those type-2 hypervisors identified above, well it is a breeze for students to experience labs showing RAID functionality.
    I know this is a late reply. do you perhaps have the videos or teaching on what you mentioned above. Really want to make my classes more interesting and move with the ever changing IT environment.