Liz Wannemacher

VP Marketing @ CompTIA
Staff member
Jul 31, 2019
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Chicago, Illinois
partners.comptia.org
Hello Cyber Russ! I am attaching some great information for you. It's independent research conducted by IDC which shares, from a business perspective, the value of a certification. I hope you find this useful. If you need additional detail, please email me at [email protected].

Best,
Liz
 

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Cyber Russ

Well-known member
Nov 5, 2019
59
1
68
Raleigh, NC
www.facebook.com
Hello Cyber Russ! I am attaching some great information for you. It's independent research conducted by IDC which shares, from a business perspective, the value of a certification. I hope you find this useful. If you need additional detail, please email me at [email protected].

Best,
Liz
Perfect! Thank you!
 
In general, certifications are valuable to those that value them. While this statement may be kind of lame, I have run into employers that do not value certifications at all; they want hard experience. And then there are some, particularly where there are contractual obligations (very common in the DoD), where a certain percentage of employed personnel have to have this-or-that cert. Generally, DoD Directive 8570 is a big driver for that.

Personally, I think any two-year level IT professional should have the CompTIA trifecta as a standard (A+, Net+, and Sec+), along with one OS cert like Linux+ or MCP. As to the A+, if I had regular bench techs or touch-labor client specialists working for me, I would insist they have A+ before they start work - because that way, there is a third party validation for what they do. And if they teach, they better have the cert before they even think about starting teaching. And having gone through the 1001 and 1002 material (I'm retaking these tests myself), I think the content validates hardware skills well enough for their intent.

Overall, though, I've also seen where someone has the cert and does not have the skills. It happens. People cheat. They use braindumps because they see the value of having the credential, but do not value earning it themselves (they just want the job) - so this erodes trust in the certification. While CompTIA, Microsoft, and Cisco (among others) take steps to make it hard for cheaters, there will always be "paper certs" out there, stealing certification value for their own purposes.

So, in the end, the more general we ask, "Is the such-and-such cert valuable" the harder it is to answer. There are studies that validate it. But to quote an old D&D gamer rule, "Specific trumps General".

Hopefully my pontificating has answered the question to someone's satisfaction. ;)

/r
 

Cyber Russ

Well-known member
Nov 5, 2019
59
1
68
Raleigh, NC
www.facebook.com
In general, certifications are valuable to those that value them. While this statement may be kind of lame, I have run into employers that do not value certifications at all; they want hard experience. And then there are some, particularly where there are contractual obligations (very common in the DoD), where a certain percentage of employed personnel have to have this-or-that cert. Generally, DoD Directive 8570 is a big driver for that.

Personally, I think any two-year level IT professional should have the CompTIA trifecta as a standard (A+, Net+, and Sec+), along with one OS cert like Linux+ or MCP. As to the A+, if I had regular bench techs or touch-labor client specialists working for me, I would insist they have A+ before they start work - because that way, there is a third party validation for what they do. And if they teach, they better have the cert before they even think about starting teaching. And having gone through the 1001 and 1002 material (I'm retaking these tests myself), I think the content validates hardware skills well enough for their intent.

Overall, though, I've also seen where someone has the cert and does not have the skills. It happens. People cheat. They use braindumps because they see the value of having the credential, but do not value earning it themselves (they just want the job) - so this erodes trust in the certification. While CompTIA, Microsoft, and Cisco (among others) take steps to make it hard for cheaters, there will always be "paper certs" out there, stealing certification value for their own purposes.

So, in the end, the more general we ask, "Is the such-and-such cert valuable" the harder it is to answer. There are studies that validate it. But to quote an old D&D gamer rule, "Specific trumps General".

Hopefully my pontificating has answered the question to someone's satisfaction. ;)

/r

Thank you for this!! I made a video about A+ from my perspective. I didn't dive too much into it, but my message is out there. Let me know your thoughts:

Cybersecurity Lounge -- A+ Certification
 

Cyber Russ

Well-known member
Nov 5, 2019
59
1
68
Raleigh, NC
www.facebook.com
Video is a good overview of the domains.

But a couple of production questions - it appears that the video is lagging about 1/8th a second behind the audio, and there were black outs in your video at different points.

Oh man...I will have to check that out...I didn't see that on my end. I will go back to the editor. Not sure what happened...Not many subscribers yet, so it is ok. Thanks!!