Cracking down on braindumps and leaks

I'm also one of these MCSE's that got blanded out because of all the paper MCSE types and brain dump types that cheapened the exams down. I'm proud of getting it (it was long ago, mind you), but when I started seeing job ads, followed by colleges running ads "Get your MCSE and make $65000", well, there was a very large carrot to draw people into doing the wrong thing.
I earned my MCSE in 2006 and was an MCT from 2006-2017. I also earned my MCTS in SharePoint, along with multiple MOS Master certifications.

I gave up my MCT in 2017 for several reasons.

1) They doubled the annual fee for renewing the MCT. It's silly that any vendor chargers a person money TO TEACH THEIR CONTENT, but it's ridiculous to double the fee.

2) The quality of the training materials plummeted over the years. In the early 2000s, their stuff was rather good. But they attempted to cut costs and the quality dropped. Eventually, they hired subcontractors to create content, slide decks, and labs and none of it had any quality control. I would set up labs verbatim and they would blow up every single time. I found myself constantly apologizing for both the content and the labs.

3) The market was flooded with MCSEs. Both legitimately earned and paper MCSEs. The supply was greater than the demand.

I haven't taken a Microsoft exam since 2016. I've heard their new exams are better, but I have no idea. I'm working on finishing up Linux+ and Data+ before working on some AWS, ISACA, and (ISC)2 exams.
 

Tess Sluijter

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Apr 1, 2020
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Next up, ExamTopics?
I'm working on finishing up Linux+ and Data+ before working on some AWS, ISACA, and (ISC)2 exams.
You may want to try and fit the current (ISC)2 beta exam in your short-term planning. I'm taking the beta for "EL" (entry-level) next week, to scope it out for my students. If the exam turns out to be good, I'll recommend it to our school as replacement for MTA-Sec and as better alternative to Sec+.

-> https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/entry-level-certification-pilot/Exam-Outline
 
Next up, ExamTopics?

You may want to try and fit the current (ISC)2 beta exam in your short-term planning. I'm taking the beta for "EL" (entry-level) next week, to scope it out for my students. If the exam turns out to be good, I'll recommend it to our school as replacement for MTA-Sec and as better alternative to Sec+.

-> https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/entry-level-certification-pilot/Exam-Outline
ISACA has their own entry level certifications. The Information Technology Certified Associate (ITCA) Cybersecurity Fundamentals exam has been out for a short while.

I honestly don't know how the (ISC)2 EL cert and the ISACA Cybersecurity Fundamentals cert stack up against CompTIA's Sec+, My guess is that both would be considered lower level certs in comparison.

If I had to guess, I would think the (ISC)2 Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP) would be a rough equivalent of the Sec+. Either that or the GIAC Information Security Fundamentals (GISF), although that one is a bit cost prohibitive.

Since my role has changed as a trainer in that I no longer teach CompTIA/Microsoft/ISACA/(ISC)2 and instead my company's proprietary platform, any new certifications I pursue would strictly be for the purpose of rounding out my overall knowledge base.
 
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I honestly don't know how the (ISC)2 EL cert and the ISACA Cybersecurity Fundamentals cert stack up against CompTIA's Sec+, My guess is that both would be considered lower level certs in comparison.
I agree with your assessment that out of ELCC (from ISC2), I-CSF (from ISACA), GFACT (from GIAC) and Sec+, Sec+ actually seems like the best entry-level cert. Both in objectives / curriculum, in exam quality and in costs.

GIAC is usually excellent, but ludicrously expensive. ELCC has a good set of objectives, but the exam is flimsy (I took it this week) and ISACA feels extortionate when it comes to exam costs and maintenance fees.

So I'll push for more CompTIA.