Linux+ 005 beta?

Tess Sluijter

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Apr 1, 2020
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Hola!

I noticed in the CompTIA roadmap that Linux+ 005 should go live around June/July-ish in 2022.

Can anyone from CompTIA confirm/deny whether we'll be getting a beta for that version? I've got a few people, who are really enthused about the idea. :)
 
Definitely looking forward to the new Linux+ (I'll be writing the 6th edition of my Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification for Cengage to be geared to it).

My secret wish list for XK0-005 updates include:
-Fewer legacy topics (rsyslogd, SysV init)
-More Git and network services
-Ansible
-Z shell
-ZFS
-More vim (it's a vi-able skill ;-)
 
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Tess Sluijter

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2020
244
1
341
the Netherlands
www.kilala.nl
Definitely looking forward to the new Linux+ (I'll be writing the 6th edition of my Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification for Cengage to be geared to it).

My secret wish list for updates include:
-Less legacy topics (rsyslogd, SysV init)
-More Git and network services
-Ansible
-Z shell
-ZFS

  • Less SysV Init I can get behind, definitely. But rsyslog is still very useful with lots of networking devices and application stacks using it for remote log capture.
  • More Git? Oh please no, it already felt like 30% of my exam was about git.
  • Ansible, 100%. I know that it's not a vendor-independent product, but at the same time: yes it is.
  • Z shell? Sure, why not. Though any other "regular" shell, like Bash, tcsh etc is also fine.
  • ZFS? I've never used it, but that's probably because I don't work with big storage systems.

My wish list?
  1. Ansible basics.
  2. Docker, LXC or other containerization hands-on, not just the tiny bit about concepts.
  3. Setting up an actual web service with httpd or nginx, includingproper TLS certificates.
    1. Self-signed certs need not apply!
  4. Load-balancing hands-on, with nginx or even Docker Swarm. I know, K8S is even cooler, but also a bit too deep.
  5. Not just the concepts, but actual hands-on with OS install automation. Vagrant, Terraform and some of the topics they only discuss briefly in 004.
 
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  • Less SysV Init I can get behind, definitely. But rsyslog is still very useful with lots of networking devices and application stacks using it for remote log capture.
  • More Git? Oh please no, it already felt like 30% of my exam was about git.
  • Ansible, 100%. I know that it's not a vendor-independent product, but at the same time: yes it is.
  • Z shell? Sure, why not. Though any other "regular" shell, like Bash, tcsh etc is also fine.
  • ZFS? I've never used it, but that's probably because I don't work with big storage systems.

My wish list?
  1. Ansible basics.
  2. Docker, LXC or other containerization hands-on, not just the tiny bit about concepts.
  3. Setting up an actual web service with httpd or nginx, includingproper TLS certificates.
    1. Self-signed certs need not apply!
  4. Load-balancing hands-on, with nginx or even Docker Swarm. I know, K8S is even cooler, but also a bit too deep.
  5. Not just the concepts, but actual hands-on with OS install automation. Vagrant, Terraform and some of the topics they only discuss briefly in 004.
:)
- I can understand keeping rsyslog for those reasons.
- I only got a single git question when I wrote XK0-004 (which is why I wanted more) - every exam is different I guess!
- Z shell basics and environment files are good mainly because many distros are starting to adopt it as the default shell (e.g. Kali), and macOS does as well.
- ZFS is sooo pervasive on Linux in many of the datacenter environments I work with (as well as on-prem NAS/fileservers) as it's arguably the most powerful filesystem out there (root filesystem on each node is typically ext4/xfs and all other storage is ZFS)
- How did I not recommend docker/podman and LXC/proxmox?!? Awesome and so relevant to so many Linux admin/devops/dev jobs. Knowing why Terraform is good for creating infrastructure (replicatable, can be audited) is very good, but as with so many of the technologies in that space, I'm sceptical if further depth is worth it given the audience and breadth of Linux+ (a lot of IaC is just sweat equity and geared to a specific environment).
- I'd love to see more service configuration - sshd, vsftpd, samba, nfs4, apache2 (with TLS and virtual hosts), named, dhcpd, ntpd, postgres would be my wish list.
 
Hear hear! Sure, that way it will become more like LPI and LFCS, or even the older style RHCSA (but MC instead of hands-on). Ahhh, now I wish we could help with those objectives, Jason!
Out of curiosity, I did check out the application page to become an SME (https://www.comptia.org/certifications/become-a-subject-matter-expert), and even filled out nearly the entire application. But near the bottom, they want you to upload a resume (in addition to LinkedIn). And while I keep my LinkedIn updated, I haven't created a resume in 23 years and don't plan on doing that just for an SME application, so I just closed the page. After all, laziness is an important trait of all Unix/Linux admins 😏
 
Also, from what I understand, once you become an SME, you are limited in anything else you can do, like webinars, TTTs, and what not. They also don't like to use instructors as SMEs, mostly just industry folks. 🤷‍♂️

Just my opinion.
I guess that makes sense.
For the few of us who straddle both the educational and industry side, we'll always choose to keep the instructor benefits ;-)
 

Tess Sluijter

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2020
244
1
341
the Netherlands
www.kilala.nl
Out of curiosity, I did check out the application page to become an SME (https://www.comptia.org/certifications/become-a-subject-matter-expert), and even filled out nearly the entire application. But near the bottom, they want you to upload a resume (in addition to LinkedIn). And while I keep my LinkedIn updated, I haven't created a resume in 23 years and don't plan on doing that just for an SME application, so I just closed the page. After all, laziness is an important trait of all Unix/Linux admins 😏
Thanks for that link Jason! That's helpful. I thought SMEs were more by invitation.


Also, from what I understand, once you become an SME, you are limited in anything else you can do, like webinars, TTTs, and what not. They also don't like to use instructors as SMEs, mostly just industry folks.
🤷‍♂️


Just my opinion.

Huh, well, I'm an interesting mix then because I'm "industry folk" 90% of my time and instructor for only 10%. I guess I can pass up on the TTTs though, so let's see what being an SME is about. Let's see if they even accept European folks.


For the few of us who straddle both the educational and industry side, we'll always choose to keep the instructor benefits ;-)

Nah, not me.

EDIT:

I read the SME page... Yeah, that's a "No" for me, bub. I'm not traveling internationally.

Applying for a workshop at CompTIA headquarters means you must be able to commit to up to an eight-hour day, five-day work week at CompTIA in Downers Grove, Ill. Downers Grove is a Chicago suburb, accessible by car from both O’Hare and Midway airports.
 
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Tess Sluijter

Well-known member
Apr 1, 2020
244
1
341
the Netherlands
www.kilala.nl
The Linux+ beta is up! For $50 you will get to take the exam and get fully certified if you pass.

Login at PearsonVue as if you'd normally schedule your exam. When searching for Linux+, you will also find the 005 beta.

113ish questions and the benefit of an extended timer - 165 minutes. Exam will be available until February 18, 2022

EDIT:

The objectives can be downloaded from the official Linux+ page. I hope to make a comparison soon.

OH YES! The new objectives have a whole block dedicated to PKI, certificates and managing TLS etc. This makes me happy! :D

I wanted to discuss Jason and my wishlists, but I just noticed that we're not allowed to, there's an embargo.
 
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